Github or Gitlab


(Erwan Roussel) #1

With the acquisition of Github by Microsoft this week,
I wanted to left Github for Gitlab, but nobody is on gitlab so nobody will see my repo ?

What do you think about it ?

Do you have any idea about how people can see my repo if I go to gitlab ?


(Anik Hasibul) #2

Github!

people are moving to gitlab. that makes no sense!

Gitlab is also an Azure powered website/platform!

And I think,
people who are moving to gitlab, doesn’t have any good reason that makes sense.

Why should I even bother about it? :confused:

Who cares about the owner? :confused:

Did they know the name of the founders of github before yesterday? :confused:


(Lutz Horn) #3

Self host your code using Gitea.


(Jakob Borg) #4

Relax. The acquisition won’t happen for six months or so, see if you still feel the same then and what the community has decided in the meantime. Personally I think Microsoft will be a fine steward and we have nothing more to worry about than we had yesterday. Less, in fact, as now GitHub actually has stable financing.


(Curtis Allyn Green) #5

Wait no one else pays for github? lol


(Norbert Melzer) #6

I prefer gitlab over GitHub for ages, mostly because CI is actually a native part of the service and not something external as with GitHub and Travis. Also it’s much more flexible as one can use arbitrary docker images for running the tests.

You even get a project specific docker registry at gitlab.

Also I prefer gitlab nomenclature of Merge Requests over GitHubs Pull Request, but that’s just a name.

Even more important for me is, that I can click a button in an issue and a MR with branch is created automatically, I just need to pull and can work.

Also the WIP feature which disables accidentally merging unfinished MRs is cool.

Last but not least I like that issues and MRs have distinct numbering and are distinguished by prefixing with either # for issues or ! for MRs.


(David Luu) #7

As a failsafe, you can host on both sites, and have one be the default with the other being an old clone/mirror. e.g. on the old one, add link in README and description/title to point to the active repo. That way, whichever one becomes obsolete/deprecated, users will still be able to find your repo.

Though of course, that’s different for go get of your package, but at least in terms of browsing for it on the web, it’s “findable”.


(joielechong) #8

Gitlab is also an Azure powered website/platform!

Gitlab is powered with Google cloud https://venturebeat.com/2018/04/06/why-and-how-gitlab-abandoned-microsoft-azure-for-google-cloud/


(Ajil Raju) #9

I think the Github is not an opensource project, but we use it, We need a platform why we bother the owners :blush:


(Anik Hasibul) #11

Don’t believe everything you see on the internet,

ipinfo 52.167.219.168
{
  "ip": "52.167.219.168",
  "hostname": "gitlab.com",
  "city": "Boydton",
  "region": "Virginia",
  "country": "US",
  "loc": "36.6648,-78.3715",
  "postal": "23917",
  "org": "AS8075 Microsoft Corporation"
}

(Dipak Kumar) #12

According to GitLab wikipedia

In June 2018, the acquisition of competitor GitHub by Microsoft caused a migration of over 250,000 projects to GitLab, validated through twitter

GitLab is providing assistance and discount on moving to GitLab #movingtogitlab.

According to ipinfo GitLab is hosted on Microsoft Network https://ipinfo.io/52.167.219.168


Reason for migrating from GitHub to GitLab is still unknown


(Erwan Roussel) #13

Gitlab has a very good docker container registry and that is very useful for me but for my open source projects I should maybe use GitHub… But Gitea was a good option


(system) #14

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